A Good Wife

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It is eight o’clock on a Sunday morning, and we are having snow flurries.  I have just finished my study time with God and was thinking how I have been blessed with Badona.  I know God put us together because I surely didn’t make a good impression.  On our first date, I had problems with the catsup bottle and shot catsup across the table and onto her blouse.  A few months later my dog bit her, and she had to get a tetanus shot.  She had a bad reaction to the shot and broke out with a serious rash.  My dog got sick that same week (unrelated to the biting incident) and had to be put down.

In any case, we have now been married for over 31 years.  She is thrifty and makes sure that we live below our income.  We have been able to save a little for our future.  I just gave her my paycheck when I used to work, and she manages money well.   She likes shopping, and I don’t.  If I were to do the shopping, I would come back with nothing.  I use things up until I can’t wear them or use them in any way.

My wife is also organized like I am.  We both keep calendars.  I couldn’t live with someone who wasn’t organized.  She finds time to go and visit people with me.  I have been blessed!

My First Tackle Box

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As I remember some of my early years of fishing, I’m looking forward to shad fishing in March.  The fishing year starts in March when the shad run begins.  It ends in December with striper fishing.  I enjoy all kinds of fishing that I can afford, both salt and fresh water.

I remember when my grandpa gave me my first tackle fishing box.  It was metal, and I had it for many years, even during my married life.  I would still have it if I hadn’t run over it with my truck.  Grandpa gave it to me the second time that we went to that pond.  He had put some lures in it, and one of those lures was the one that he caught that big bass the first time we were at the pond.

Uncle Russell caught the most fish with his minnows, while grandpa and I used lures.  I caught two bass; they were only a pound and a half.  They weren’t nearly as big as the one grandpa caught last time, but I was praised.

It was neat to see a fish hit a lure that was on the surface of the water.  The bass didn’t pull as hard as the shad did, but I thought that I was a good fisherman and I talked like I knew what I was doing.  Other boys were using bobbers, and I was using lures.  I still have the same fishing fever.  I couldn’t wait until I was old enough to go fishing all by myself in the Chickahominy Swamp.  That is another story.  I used to go there almost every day in the summers.

Be Thrifty, Shop Smart

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My wife bought some new dish towels and bath towels.  They look good, but that is all.  I’m not happy with the products that are out there to buy.  Towels are supposed to dry things not push water around!  There is nothing like an old-fashioned towel, washed and hung outside to dry.  They absorb water, you are dry in no time, and you get a good back scratch!

A lot of products are over-priced and then are marked down on sale.  But they still are over-priced at the sale price.  And then the products are not satisfactory.  To me the thrift stores are a lot better than the big-named stores.

I guess people feel they have no choice but to buy what is offered.  Prices will go down if we don’t buy.  Remember how everything went up in price when gas and diesel prices were high?  Since businesses got that much money back then, they want to keep getting it now.

I encourage you to shop smart.  Take things back if you aren’t satisfied.  Don’t fall for commercials.  Be thrifty.  We don’t need to show off for anybody.  Humility is a good trait, and I would rather see people show off Christ and what He has done in their life!

 

 

Take a Kid Fishing

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A good way to start a kid fishing is to take them shad fishing.  It is easy to catch fish that are running.  They are also on the larger size and fight hard.  Grandpa Wish gave me a pflugger plug to practice casting.  I saw how those men caught a lot of fish by throwing their lines out farther.

At school, I told the boys about the two fish I had caught and my new fishing rod.  When I got home, I practiced casting.  I wanted to be ready to go to the river next time.  It seemed like a long time before we went again because my grandparents didn’t drive yet.  They lived in Richmond on Ellwood Avenue, and they either rode the bus or walked.  Uncle Russell drove and had a car, so everything depended on his schedule.  It was a few years later that Grandpa got a driver’s license and bought a 1963 Dodge Dart.  That blue Dodge Dart lasted a long time.  When he finally bought a brown Dodge Dart, my parents got the blue one.

The next time Uncle Russell took us fishing it was in a pond.  I don’t remember where it was.  This time he fished with a hook and worm or with minnows.  Grandpa Wish tied a little spinner that he made on my line and set me up before he got ready.  He watched me cast with encouraging words and told me how to wind the reel.  Then he got his ready, putting on a floating plug.  He caught the first fish.  It was a large-mouth bass, and it was big.  Or at least it was big to me.  And just like the shad fishing, he unhooked the bass and let it back in the water.

Uncle Russell and I did catch fish, but mine were smaller.  They were called brim.  Mine were kept and ate.